On Faith and Science

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Yale University Press #ad - In this enlightening and accessible volume, philosopher of science and Gifford Lecturer, distinguished historian and Pulitzer Prize–winning author Edward Larson and Michael Ruse, offer their distinctive viewpoints on the sometimes contentious relationship between science and religion. A captivating historical survey of the key debates, scientific discovery has clashed with religious dogma, and controversies at the intersection of science and religion Throughout history, controversy, creating conflict, questions, and sometimes violent dispute.

Broaching their subjects from both historical and philosophical perspectives, Larson and Ruse avoid rancor and polemic as they address many of the core issues currently under debate by the adherents of science and the advocates of faith, shedding light on the richly diverse field of ideas at the crossroads where science meets spiritual belief.

On Faith and Science #ad - The authors explore how scientists, including cosmology, philosophers, genetics, and theologians through time and today approach vitally important topics, neurobiology, gender, evolution, geology, and the environment.

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Science and Religion: Some Historical Perspectives Canto Classics

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Cambridge University Press #ad - John hedley brooke offers an introduction and critical guide to one of the most fascinating and enduring issues in the development of the modern world: the relationship between scientific thought and religious belief. Taking account of recent scholarship in the history of science, Brooke takes a fresh look at these and similar episodes, showing that science and religion have been mutually relevant in so rich a variety of ways that no simple generalizations are possible.

The trial of galileo in 1633 and the uproar caused by Darwin's Origin of Species 1859 are two of the most famous examples. It is common knowledge that in western societies there have been periods of crisis when new science has threatened established authority.

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The Witch of Lime Street: Séance, Seduction, and Houdini in the Spirit World

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Crown #ad - The witch of lime street, returns us to an oft-mythologized era to deepen our understanding of its history, the first book to capture their electric public rivalry and the competition that brought them into each other’s orbit, all while igniting our imagination and engaging with the timeless question: Is there life after death? .

Against this backdrop, the pretty wife of a distinguished Boston surgeon came to embody the raging national debate over Spiritualism, in 1924, a movement devoted to communication with the dead. A desperate search for reunion with dead loved ones precipitated a tidal wave of self-proclaimed psychics—and, as reputable media sought stories on occult phenomena, mediums became celebrities.

The Witch of Lime Street: Séance, Seduction, and Houdini in the Spirit World #ad - Admired for both her exceptional charm and her dazzling effects, Margery was the best hope for the psychic practice to be empirically verified. Her supernatural gifts beguiled four of the judges. History comes alive in this textured account of the rivalry between Harry Houdini and the so-called Witch of Lime Street, whose iconic lives intersected at a time when science was on the verge of embracing the paranormal.

The 1920s are famous as the golden age of jazz and glamour, but it was also an era of fevered yearning for communion with the spirit world, after the loss of tens of millions in the First World War and the Spanish-flu epidemic. Her most vocal advocate was none other than sherlock holmes' creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who believed so thoroughly in Margery's powers that he urged her to enter a controversial contest, sponsored by Scientific American and offering a large cash prize to the first medium declared authentic by its impressive five-man investigative committee.

Reporters dubbed her the blonde Witch of Lime Street, but she was known to her followers simply as Margery. There was only one left to convince.

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Living with a Wild God: A Nonbeliever's Search for the Truth about Everything

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Twelve #ad - From the new york times bestselling author of Nickel and Dimed comes a brave, frank, and exquisitely written memoir that will change the way you see the world. Barbara ehrenreich is one of the most important thinkers of our time. The result is both deeply personal and cosmically sweeping-a searing memoir and a profound reflection on science, religion, and the human condition.

In living with a wild god, she recounts her quest-beginning in childhood-to find "the truth" about the universe and everything else: What's really going on? Why are we here? In middle age, in all the intervening years, which records an event so strange, so cataclysmic, she rediscovered the journal she had kept during her tumultuous adolescence, that she had never, written or spoken about it to anyone.

Living with a Wild God: A Nonbeliever's Search for the Truth about Everything #ad - Educated as a scientist, she is an author, journalist, activist, and advocate for social justice. With her signature combination of intellectual rigor and uninhibited imagination, Ehrenreich offers a true literary achievement-a work that has the power not only to entertain but amaze. It was the kind of event that people call a "mystical experience"-and, to a steadfast atheist and rationalist, nothing less than shattering.

In living with a wild god, bringing an older woman's wry and erudite perspective to a young girl's impassioned obsession with the questions that, at one point or another, Ehrenreich reconstructs her childhood mission, torment us all.

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New Cosmic Story: Inside Our Awakening Universe

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Yale University Press #ad - He contends that many others who have written books on life and the universe—including Stephen Hawking, Stephen Jay Gould, and Richard Dawkins—have overlooked a crucial aspect of cosmic history: the drama of life’s awakening to interiority and religious awareness. Science may illuminate the outside story of the universe, but a full telling of the cosmic story cannot ignore the inside development that interiority represents.

. A foremost thinker on science and religion argues that an adequate understanding of cosmic history requires attention to the emergence of interiority, including religious aspiration Over the past two centuries scientific advances have made it clear that the universe is a story still unfolding. Haught addresses two primary questions: what does the arrival of religion tell us about the universe, he asserts, and what does our understanding of the cosmos as an unfinished drama tell us about religion? The history of religion may be ambiguous and sometimes even barbarous, but its role in the story of cosmic emergence and awakening must be taken into account.

New Cosmic Story: Inside Our Awakening Universe #ad - Haught considers the deeper implications of this discovery. In this thought-provoking book, John F.

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Father and Son

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Start Publishing LLC #ad - His work is a key document of the crisis of faith and doubt and a penetrating exploration of the impact of evolutionary science. Edmund gosse wrote of his account of his life, "This book is the record of a struggle between two temperaments, two consciences and almost two epochs. Father and son remains one of English literature's seminal autobiographies.

In it, edmund gosse recounts, with humor and pathos, his childhood as a member of a Victorian Protestant sect and his struggles to forge his own identity despite the loving control of his father. An astute, and moving portrait of the tensions of family life, well-observed, Father and Son remains a classic of twentieth-century literature.

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A Meaning to Life Philosophy in Action

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Oxford University Press #ad - O. In the 19th century, however, charles Darwin's theory of evolution changed everything-and the human organism was seen to be more machine than spirit. Does human life have any meaning? does the question even make sense today? For centuries, the question of the meaning or purpose of human life was assumed by scholars and theologians to have a religious answer: life has meaning because humans were made in the image of a good god.

Ruse explains that, in a tradition going back to the time of Darwin himself, and represented today by the evolutionist E. Wilson, evolution is seen as progress -- "from monad to man" - and that positive meaning is found in continuing and supporting this upwards path of life. If god no longer exists-or if god no longer cares-rather than promoting a bleak nihilism, many Darwinians think we can convert Darwin into a form of secular humanism.

A Meaning to Life Philosophy in Action #ad - If it does, where might we find it?the historian and philosopher of science Michael Ruse investigates this question, and wonders whether we can find a new meaning to life within Darwinian views of human nature. Ruse argues that it is only by accepting our true nature - evolved over millennia - that humankind can truly find what is meaningful.

Ever since, with the rise of science and decline of religious belief, there has been growing interest - and growing doubt - about whether human life really does have meaning. Rather, meaning in the darwinian age can be found if we turn to a kind of Darwinian existentialism, seeing our evolved human nature as the source of all meaning, both in the intellectual and social worlds.

In a meaning to life, michael ruse argues that this is a false turn, and there is no real progress in the evolutionary process.

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Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion

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Basic Books #ad - That trial marked the start of a battle that continues to this day-in cities and states throughout the country. An afterword assesses the state of the battle between creationism and evolution, and points the way to how it might potentially be resolved. Edward larson's classic summer for the Gods -- winner of the Pulitzer Prize in History -- is the single most authoritative account of this pivotal event.

The pulitzer prize-winning history of the scopes trial and the battle over evolution and creation in america's schoolsIn the summer of 1925, religion, Tennessee, in a famous debate over science, the sleepy hamlet of Dayton, pitting William Jennings Bryan and the anti-Darwinists against a teacher named John Scopes, became the setting for one of the twentieth century's most contentious courtroom dramas, represented by Clarence Darrow and the ACLU, and their place in public education.

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Science and Religion: A Historical Introduction

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Johns Hopkins University Press #ad - Wilson, edward Grant, David C. Noll, Edward J. Dembski, David N. Numbers, Steven J. Weldon. They assess changes in scientific understanding brought about by eighteenth- and nineteenth-century transformations in geology, and biology, cosmology, together with the responses of both mainstream religious groups and such newer movements as evangelicalism and fundamentalism.

Larson, richard olson, robin Collins, Craig Sean McConnell, William A. Osler, Richard S. Tracing the rise of science from its birth in the medieval West through the scientific revolution, the contributors describe major shifts that were marked by discoveries such as those of Copernicus, Galileo, and Isaac Newton and the Catholic and Protestant reactions to them.

Science and Religion: A Historical Introduction #ad - Contributors: Colin A. Lindberg, owen gingerich, Alnoor Dhanani, Richard J. Westfall, john Hedley Brooke, Nicolaas A. Rupke, Peter M. This wide-ranging collection also introduces a variety of approaches to understanding their intersection, suggesting a model not of inalterable conflict, but of complex interaction.

Davis, Michael P. Written by distinguished historians of science and religion, the thirty essays in this volume survey the relationship of Western religious traditions to science from the beginning of the Christian era to the late twentieth century. Blackwell, Edward B.

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How Reason Can Lead to God: A Philosopher's Bridge to Faith

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IVP Academic #ad - Do you seek the truth?do you value reason, " yet you remain interested in the big questions of life? Do you hope there could be a greater purpose to the universe, and independent thinking? Are you skeptical of beliefs that people maintain merely "on faith, if only that were realistic?If so, science, then philosopher Joshua Rasmussen can encourage you in your journey.

. Beginning with his own story of losing faith and the belief in any ultimate purpose in life, he then builds a bridge to a series of universal truths about ultimate reality. Using only the instruments of reason and common experience, Rasmussen constructs a pathway―step by step, ultimately, brick by brick―that he argues can lead to meaning and, a vision of God.

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Liberty in the Things of God: The Christian Origins of Religious Freedom

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Yale University Press #ad - From one of the leading historians of christianity comes this sweeping reassessment of religious freedom, from the church fathers to John Locke   In the ancient world Christian apologists wrote in defense of their right to practice their faith in the cities of the Roman Empire. Chronicling the history of the struggle for religious freedom from the early Christian movement through the seventeenth century, not political, Robert Louis Wilken shows that the origins of religious freedom and liberty of conscience are religious, in origin.

They argued that religious faith is an inward disposition of the mind and heart and cannot be coerced by external force, laying a foundation on which later generations would build. This provocative book, drawing on writings from the early Church as well as the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, reminds us of how “the meditations of the past were fitted to affairs of a later day.

Liberty in the Things of God: The Christian Origins of Religious Freedom #ad - ”. They took form before the enlightenment through the labors of men and women of faith who believed there could be no justice in society without liberty in the things of God.

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