The Metaphysical Club: A Story of Ideas in America

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - The one thing we know that came out of it was an idea -- an idea about ideas. The club was probably in existence for about nine months. This is a book about a way of thinking that changed American life. Its members included Oliver Well Holmes, Jr. The father of modern american psychology; and Charles Sanders Peirce, logician, future associate justice of the United States Supreme Court; William James, scientist, and the founder of semiotics.

The metaphysical Club is written in the spirit of this idea about ideas. And they thought that the survival of any idea deps not on its immutability but on its adaptability. The metaphysical club is the winner of the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for History. A riveting, original book about the creation of modern American thought.

The Metaphysical Club: A Story of Ideas in America #ad - The metaphysical club was an informal group that met in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1872, to talk about ideas. They do not develop according to some inner logic of their own but are entirely depent -- like germs -- on their human carriers and environment. V. It begins with the civil war and s in 1919 with Justice Holmes's dissenting opinion in the case of U.

S. Abrams-the basis for the constitutional law of free speech.

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The Marketplace of Ideas: Reform and Resistance in the American University Issues of Our Time

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - Crisp and illuminating. Sparking a long-overdue debate about the future of american education, The Marketplace of Ideas argues that twenty-first-century professors and students are essentially trying to function in a nineteenth-century system, and that the resulting conflict threatens to overshadow the basic pursuit of knowledge and truth.

Despite the vast social changes and technological advancements that have revolutionized the society at large, general principles of scholarly organization, curriculum, and philosophy have remained remarkably static. Well worth reading. Wall street journalthe publication of the marketplace of ideas has precipitated a lively debate about the future of the American university system: what makes it so hard for colleges to decide which subjects are required? Why are so many academics against the concept of interdisciplinary studies? From his position at the heart of academe, Harvard professor Louis Menand thinks he's found the answer.

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American Transcendentalism: A History

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Hill and Wang #ad - The transcendentalists would painfully bifurcate over what could be attained and how, the other by Orestes Brownson, George Ripley, one half epitomized by Ralph Waldo Emerson and stressing self-reliant individualism, and Theodore Parker, emphasizing commitment to the larger social good. By the 1850s, the uniquely American problem of slavery dissolved differences as transcendentalists turned ever more exclusively to abolition.

Philip F. The first comprehensive history of transcendentalismamerican Transcendentalism is a comprehensive narrative history of America's first group of public intellectuals, the men and women who defined American literature and indelibly marked American reform in the decades before and following the America Civil War.

American Transcendentalism: A History #ad - Along with their early inheritance from European Romanticism, America's transcendentalists abandoned their interest in general humanitarian reform. Gura masterfully traces their intellectual genealogy to transatlantic religious and philosophical ideas, so often first in Massachusetts and eventually throughout America, illustrating how these informed the fierce local theological debates that, personal, and quixotic attempts to improve, gave rise to practical, even perfect the world.

By war's end, transcendentalism had become identified exclusively with Emersonian self-reliance, congruent with the national ethos of political liberalism and market capitalism.

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Age of Fracture

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Harvard University Press #ad - Rodgers presents the first broadly gauged history of the ideas and arguments that profoundly reshaped America in the last quarter of the twentieth century. From the ways in which ronald reagan changed the formulas of the cold War presidency to the era’s intense debates over gender, and history, economics, race, it maps the dynamics through which mid-twentieth-century ideas of structure fell apart between the mid 1970s and the end of the century.

Where conventional histories of modern america have focused on specific decades, the book traces the larger transformations in social ideas and visions that reshaped the era from the early 1970s through the end of the century.

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American Studies

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - He reveals the reasons for the remarkable commercial successes of William Shawn's New Yorker and William Paley's CBS. And he lends an ear to al gore in the White House as the Starr Report is finally presented to the public. Like his critically acclaimed bestseller, the metaphysical Club, American Studies is intellectual and cultural history at its best: game and detached, with a strong curiosity about the political underpinnings of ideas and about the reasons successful ideas insinuate themselves into the culture at large.

He locates the importance of richard Wright, Norman Mailer, Christopher Lasch, Pauline Kael, and Rolling Stone magazine. At each step of this journey through american cultural history, Louis Menand has an original point to make: he explains the real significance of William James's nervous breakdown, and of the anti-Semitism in T.

American Studies #ad - . Eliot's writing. From one of our leading thinkers and critics, these essays are incisive, known both for his "sly wit and reportorial high-jinks and clarity and rigor" The Nation, surprising, and impossible to put down. S. He uncovers the connection between Larry Flynt's Hustler and Jerry Falwell's evangelism, between the atom bomb and the Scholastic Aptitude Test.

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William James: In the Maelstrom of American Modernism

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Mariner Books #ad - The definitive biography of the fascinating William James, teaching, whose life and writing put an indelible stamp on psychology, philosophy, and religion—on modernism itself. Often cited as the “father of american psychology, ” William James was an intellectual luminary who made significant contributions to at least five fields: psychology, religious studies, teaching, philosophy, and literature.

A magnificent biography. The washington Post. In this biography that seeks to understand james’s life through his work—including Principles of Psychology, The Varieties of Religious Experience, and Pragmatism—Robert D. But it is james’s contributions to intellectual study that reveal the true complexity of man.

William James: In the Maelstrom of American Modernism #ad - After studying medicine, a choice that guided his storied career at Harvard, he ultimately realized that his true interests lay in philosophy and psychology, where he taught some of America’s greatest minds. Richardson has crafted an exceptionally insightful work that explores the mind of a genius, resulting in “a gripping and often inspiring story of intellectual and spiritual adventure” Publishers Weekly, starred review.

A member of one of the most unusual and notable of American families, the novelist Henry James; and his sister, James struggled to achieve greatness amid the brilliance of his theologian father; his brother, Alice James.

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The Silent Majority: Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South Politics and Society in Modern America Book 94

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Princeton University Press #ad - The silent majority provides the first regionwide account of the suburbanization of the South from the perspective of corporate leaders, Charlotte, political activists, and especially of the ordinary families who lived in booming Sunbelt metropolises such as Atlanta, and Richmond. During the 1960s and 1970s, the grassroots mobilization of the suburban homeowners and school parents who embraced Richard Nixon's label of the Silent Majority reshaped southern and national politics and helped to set in motion the center-right shift that has dominated the United States ever since.

Matthew lassiter examines crucial battles over racial integration, court-ordered busing, and housing segregation to explain how the South moved from the era of Jim Crow fully into the mainstream of national currents. Connecting local and national stories, public policy, and reintegrating southern and American history, The Silent Majority is critical reading for those interested in urban and suburban studies, the civil rights movement, political and social history, and the intersection of race and class in modern America.

The Silent Majority: Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South Politics and Society in Modern America Book 94 #ad - Suburban sprawl transformed the political culture of the American South as much as the civil rights movement did during the second half of the twentieth century. The silent majority traces the emergence of a "color-blind" ideology in the white middle-class suburbs that defended residential segregation and neighborhood schools as the natural outcomes of market forces and individual meritocracy rather than the unconstitutional products of discriminatory public policies.

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No Game for Boys to Play: The History of Youth Football and the Origins of a Public Health Crisis Studies in Social Medicine

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - In this book, kathleen Bachynski offers the first history of youth tackle football and debates over its safety. In the postwar united states, high school football was celebrated as a "moral" sport for young boys, one that promised and celebrated the creation of the honorable male citizen. By exploring sport, masculinity, and citizenship, Bachynski uncovers the cultural priorities other than child health that made a collision sport the most popular high school game for American boys.

Even so, sports equipment manufacturers, coaches, bachynski shows that throughout the twentieth century, and even doctors were more concerned with "saving the game" than young boys' safety—even though injuries ranged from concussions and broken bones to paralysis and death. These deep-rooted beliefs continue to shape the safety debate and the possible future of youth tackle football.

No Game for Boys to Play: The History of Youth Football and the Origins of a Public Health Crisis Studies in Social Medicine #ad - From the untimely deaths of young athletes to chronic disease among retired players, roiling debates over tackle football have profound implications for more than one million American boys—some as young as five years old—who play the sport every year.

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Transcendentalism and the Cultivation of the Soul

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University of Massachusetts Press #ad - In detailing these everyday acts, Andrews uncovers a wealth of spiritual practices that could be particularly valuable today, to spiritual seekers and religious liberals. The practices are common and simple -- among them, contemplation, keeping journals, walking, reading, simple living, and conversation.

American transcendentalism is often seen as a literary movement -- a flowering of works written by New England intellectuals who retreated from society and lived in nature. In approachable and accessible prose, fuller, pursued rich and rewarding spiritual lives that inspired them to fight for abolition, Andrews demonstrates how Transcendentalism's main thinkers, women's rights, and others, Emerson, Thoreau, and education reform.

Transcendentalism and the Cultivation of the Soul #ad - In transcendentalism and the Cultivation of the Soul, Barry M. Andrews focuses on a neglected aspect of this well-known group, showing how American Transcendentalists developed rich spiritual practices to nurture their souls and discover the divine.

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As a City on a Hill: The Story of America's Most Famous Lay Sermon

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Princeton University Press #ad - In doing so, he brings to life the ideas Winthrop’s text carried in its own time and the sharply different yearnings that have been attributed to it since. As a city on a hill shows how much more malleable, more saturated with vulnerability, and less distinctly American Winthrop’s “Model of Christian Charity” was than the document that twentieth-century Americans invented.

At the same time, the book offers a probing reflection on how nationalism encourages the invention of “timeless” texts to straighten out the crooked realities of the past. More than three centuries later, Ronald Reagan remade that passage into a timeless celebration of American promise. Across almost four centuries, rodgers traces striking shifts in the meaning of winthrop’s words—from Winthrop’s own anxious reckoning with the scrutiny of the world, ” to the “city on a hill” that African Americans hoped to construct in Liberia, through Abraham Lincoln’s haunting reference to this “almost chosen people, to the era of Donald Trump.

As a City on a Hill: The Story of America's Most Famous Lay Sermon #ad - As a city on a hill reveals the circuitous, unexpected ways Winthrop’s words came to lodge in American consciousness. How an obscure puritan sermon came to be seen as a founding document of American identity and exceptionalism“For we must consider that we shall be as a city upon a hill, ” John Winthrop warned his fellow Puritans at New England’s founding in 1630

How were winthrop’s long-forgotten words reinvented as a central statement of American identity and exceptionalism? In As a City on a Hill, leading American intellectual historian Daniel Rodgers tells the surprising story of one of the most celebrated documents in the canon of the American idea.

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The Straight State: Sexuality and Citizenship in Twentieth-Century America Politics and Society in Modern America Book 64

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Princeton University Press #ad - Midcentury repression was not a sudden response to newly visible gay subcultures, Canaday demonstrates, but the culmination of a much longer and slower process of state-building during which the state came to know and to care about homosexuality across many decades. Canaday argues that the state's gradual awareness of homosexuality intensified during the later New Deal and through the postwar period as policies were enacted that explicitly used homosexuality to define who could enter the country, serve in the military, and collect state benefits.

Social, the straight state explores how regulation transformed the regulated: in drawing boundaries around national citizenship, and legal history at their most compelling, political, the state helped to define the very meaning of homosexuality in America. The straight state is the most expansive study of the federal regulation of homosexuality yet written.

The Straight State: Sexuality and Citizenship in Twentieth-Century America Politics and Society in Modern America Book 64 #ad - She begins at the turn of the twentieth century when the state first stumbled upon evidence of sex and gender nonconformity, revealing how homosexuality was policed indirectly through the exclusion of sexually "degenerate" immigrants and other regulatory measures aimed at combating poverty, violence, and vice.

Canaday looks at three key arenas of government control--immigration, the military, and welfare--and demonstrates how federal enforcement of sexual norms emerged with the rise of the modern bureaucratic state. Unearthing startling new evidence from the National Archives, Margot Canaday shows how the state systematically came to penalize homosexuality, giving rise to a regime of second-class citizenship that sexual minorities still live under today.

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